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That the P-32 CAN be actually fired from??

I am willing to pay the $5.00 tax for the AOW status as well. :twisted:
 

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I don't think I'd want any kind of holster that leaves the trigger exposed. Also, I believe there was a holster something like these made a few years ago for the AMT backup, and the ATF ruled them illegal (though I don't recall why).
 

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Wallet holsters

following article appeared in the "FFL Newsletter"
put out by the BATF in August 1997

WALLET GUNS

ATF has received numerous inquiries regarding wallet guns and wallet holsters.

As defined in section 5845(e) of the National Firearms Act (NFA), the term "any other weapon" includes certain concealable weapons. Various types of disguised weapons such as cane guns, belt buckle guns, and briefcase guns (with remote control firing mechanisms) fall within the "any other weapon" category. It is unlawful to make, possess, or transfer such firearms without complying with the provisions of the NFA.

During the 1970's, ATF determined that various small handguns combined with certain "wallet holsters" fall into the "any other weapon" category and are subject to the provisions of the NFA. These wallet holsters are generally rectangular in shape, are designed to disguise the appearance of the handgun, and are designed to allow the weapon to be fired while it is contained within the wallet. Than handgun combined with the wallet holster constitutes and NFA firearm.

A conventional pistol or revolver which is possessed without the wallet holster would not be an NFA firearm. A wallet holster alone is not subject to NFA controls, and cannot be registered or transferred as a firearm. Firearms contained in conventional holsters, trouser pockets, purses, gun cases, or various other forms of carrying cases have not been determined to fall within the definition of an "any other weapon," even though it may be possible to discharge a firearm while it is carried in such a manner.

In order for an individual to lawfully "make" a wallet gun, that is to say, acquire both the handgun and the wallet holster, the person must first submit an Application to Make and Register a Firearm (ATF Form 1), pay a $200.00 making tax, and receive approval of the application. The serial number appearing on the handgun should be used to register the firearm. Transfer of a wallet gun requires an approved transfer application and payment of a $5 transfer tax. A transfer will not be approved unless the wallet gun has been registered to the transferors.

Mere sale or possession of the wallet holster without the handgun is not a violation of the NFA. However, 18 U.S.C. section 2 provides that a person who aids or abets another person in the commission of an offense is also responsible for the offense. Therefore, sale or distribution of a wallet holster with knowledge that it will be used to make an unregistered NFA firearm may also place the seller or distributor of the holster in violation of the NFA.
 

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Re: Wallet holsters

RHedley said:
Mere sale or possession of the wallet holster without the handgun is not a violation of the NFA. However, 18 U.S.C. section 2 provides that a person who aids or abets another person in the commission of an offense is also responsible for the offense.
I have a Tex Shoemaker wallet-type holster for a Beretta 21A (.25 caliber) that I got 10+ years ago. It has a cut-out for the trigger so it can be fired without removing it from the holster. Not sure if if falls in this category or not. Since it is a semi-auto, I'm not sure if another round could be fire after the initial round as it appears the holster would interfere with the movement of the slide and ejection and possibly cause a jam. Sold the Beretta some years ago when the P-32 and other small .32s came out. Prior to that, the Beretta was one of the few alternatives to the Seecamp which was very hard to find / expensive at that time. Still have the holster though. Checked the Tex Shoemaker website awhile back, they apparently no longer make it.
 

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Yep, the Tex Shoemaker wallet holster IS one of the restricted wallet holsters.
My buddy with a gunshop recently went through his boxes of holsters and came up with about a dozen or so of these, which he promply cut up into little pieces with tin-snips and tossed into the trash.
Some of them looked pretty nice, too...
Oh well.
Flyer
 

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North American Arms used to sell a wallet holster for their line of mini revolvers. I bought one years ago when I carried the .22 WMR NAA mini as a pocket gun before the days of the P-32 and P-3AT.

Once I heard of the BATF's interpretation of it being an AOW, I disposed of it. I wasn't willing to pay a $200 tax on a $20 holster.

I think that I can draw and fire my P-3AT from RJ Hedley's pocket holster faster than I could pull and shoot with that old wallet holster.
 
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