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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
http://www.midwayusa.com/rewriteaproduct/820810

http://www.midwayusa.com/rewriteaproduct/622290

Which kit is better for me. I am just starting out. I will be loading .223 and .45 acp off the bat. Is it worth it to just get the 4 hole turrent kit? I have no idea what auto index is either. What justifies the price differences? Precision or durability. If its durability I guess that is fine because I can always buy more expensive equipment later on after I figure out what I am doing.

Maybe someone can help me out? :shock:

Thanks!
 

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Yep, get the turret kit.
A single-stage press can be annoying - size and deprime the cases, change the die, seat the bullet, change the die - you get the picture.
A turret press lets you skip these steps by a simple twist of your wrist.
Auto-index simply means that the press aligns the die automatically, for use with powder measures, etc., and also simply makes sure it's exactly placed for the next lever stroke.
The turret press also comes with a very good variety of accessories; about all you'll need for reloading is the components, i.e., powder, primer, and bullets (and cases).
Flyer
 

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A lot depends on what you expect to get out of your reloads. Turret type presses usually take their charge directly from a powder measure... which rarely, if ever, throws exactly the same charge twice in a row. It's close enough if you just want a bunch of ammo to go plink with... but if you're looking at maximizing accuracy, every charge dispensed by the powder measure should be weighed on a scale and trickled up to where you're within .1 grain your whatever you find is your most accurate load for any given combination of powder/bullet. Turret presses aren't the best way to go under these circumstances. There's also the rare possiblity of the dreaded "double charge" on some pistol calibers that can lead to catastrophic failures if you're not VERY careful and paying close attention to what's going on.
 

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Yep, but the Lee Powder Disk won't let you double-charge a case, unlike other powder measures that use a drum for metering. While not as precise as a scale, it does eliminate the possiblity of a double-charging.
Flyer
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Re:

Midiman said:
A lot depends on what you expect to get out of your reloads. Turret type presses usually take their charge directly from a powder measure... which rarely, if ever, throws exactly the same charge twice in a row. It's close enough if you just want a bunch of ammo to go plink with... but if you're looking at maximizing accuracy, every charge dispensed by the powder measure should be weighed on a scale and trickled up to where you're within .1 grain your whatever you find is your most accurate load for any given combination of powder/bullet. Turret presses aren't the best way to go under these circumstances. There's also the rare possiblity of the dreaded "double charge" on some pistol calibers that can lead to catastrophic failures if you're not VERY careful and paying close attention to what's going on.
Well I pay close attention to detail and I was planning on getting a digital scale and one of those powder tricklers to reloading the .223 for consistency. But I can always use the turrent press as a single stage? And do lots of ammo like one step for all the rounds i plan on reloading them ove on when i am done?

So should I get the 4 turrent or single... I am still confused on which to buy now.

is it better if I save my money and get this

http://dillonprecision.com/template/p.cfm?maj=46&dyn=1&cookieClean=1
 

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If you're going for precision, there's no need for a progressive press.
However... the one you picked is one of the best there is, and makes very precisely metered loads. What you do is weigh one of the thrown charges every dozen rounds or so to double-check the settings.
In effect, a single stage press will do anything... but is simply more time-consuming. A turret press does exactly the same thing, except it allows you to instantly change dies.
The progressive presses automatically load a round with each pull of a handle. A good starter progressive press is the Lee Pro 1000.
This comes with everything including dies for under $125! It's a great buy, and I still use mine for making bulk runs of .45.
Flyer
 

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Again, it all depends on what you're after. If you, like me, insist on weighing every charge (I use a $299 RCBS Digital Powder Pro scale after I throw the charge with a powder measure), then the turret mounted measure will be of little use to you. As for changing dies, I can unscrew my sizer and screw in the seater in under 15 seconds... no big time savings there. I never size one bullet then charge and seat it. I size 1000 - 2000 cases at a time (over several days/weeks) before moving on to the next stage. IF I was loading a lot of .45 for generic plinking ammo, I'd probably go with a turret or progressive type press. As it stands now, all I load is match grade .223 for competitive purposes and wringing every tiny bit of consistency out of my loads is crucial. I work slowly and deliberately... usually all winter long, to crank out enough ammo to get me through a summer match season... on a single stage RCBS press.
 

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This thread is aged but the topic is fresh to me. I am interested in reloading, beginning to reload. I would appreciate this: information on the basic components and theory of reloading equipment and any new information that has come to the attention of those who contributed to this thead in the past or for that matter anyone who has two cents to toss in the pot. Thanking you in advance. :D
 

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Well the first thing you should do is get one of the great books on the subject. I’m no expert reloader I don’t do any real sophisticated match grade reloading. My aim is a bunch of safe stuff to shoot up. I don’t go for P+ type rounds; in anything I usually start off fairly weak and build up to a fair but generally low charge. Eventually I find what works best for the fire arm and components I use.

Reloading is not rocket science but does demand attention with no distractions.

I use a single stage because it is inexpensive and if I get to the point of progressive loading I could still have an application for the single stage. Primarily in the sizing/recapping part of the process as you get to inspect each case before it enters the re loading process.

You can start with a minimum of equipment and get very good results. You need to measure both for powder charges, case length and overall length. You need to clean the cases, size and de-cap, it’s a good idea to clean the cap pocket. Then re-cap and then I bell the case. I do all my empty brass to this point per caliber. Then I will charge the case, seat the bullet and crimp as I need. I usually load a two to three hundred rounds at a time or when I run out of boxes.

I use Lee equipment and every 10 or so rounds I re-measure the powder charge and check the overall length. I don’t worry too much about case length but I haven’t started loading for rifle calibers yet. I do record each load data on a 3 X 5 card.

I’ve only loaded for .45colt and 44/40. I have just recently bought die set for .45acp and will be loading for the PLR-16 but at this stage I’m just collect brass, I haven’t received the 223 pistol yet so there is no hurry but I will order the set when I place my next order.
 

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Mike,
Thanks for your post and the time and trouble. It was helpful. I will keep my eye out for a good book. I will be looking for one that is good but generic. I want an unbiased account of loading equipment from the author. Thanks again. Nice avatar.
 

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I actually have and use the Lee 4-hole turret kit that you listed above. I very highly recommend it.

It can be used to make some extremely accurate loads. One recipe I use in my .270 WIn. Ruger Model 7 is a 110gr. Sierra Pro-Hunter JSP over 42.5 gr of IMR 4895 in PMC cases fired with a CCI 200 LR primer. This load will consistently throw 5 rounds into a 3/4 inch clover leaf, right where I want it at 100 yards.

I disabled the auto index on the turret, as I feel it gives you a little more control.

When loading, I place a loading tray on either side of the press. I load the try to the left with the brass, and begin. I pass them all through the decapping/resizing die one at a time, and place them in the tray to the right.

Once they have all been sized, I use a hand held Lee Auto Prime to prime the cases, placing them back into the tray on the left as I do so.

I then turn the turret to the powder through expansion die and insert a powder funnel into the top. I use a separate bench mounted Lee Perfect Powder Measure to throw the powder charge into the powder holder that came with my RCBS Range Master scale. (This powder measure is easy to adjust, and once set, has never gone out of adjustment on me. Even so, I check the weight of the powder every 10th round. Dropping the powder into the cup for the scale makes this a quick operation.) Then after expanding the case mouth, I hold the handle in the up position and dump the powder through the funnel into the case. Of course, moving the cases to the tray on the right as I finish with them.

Adjusting the turret to the bullet seating die, I seat the bullets to an overall length .005 less than touching the lands in the chamber. If the loads are handgun rounds or are for more than one particular firearm, I seat the bullets to the listed SAMMII minimum overall length. As the bullets are seated, I place them in the tray to the left.

I then rotate the turret to the Lee Factory Crimp Die, and place a decent crimp on each round, placing them in the tray to the right as I finish.

I then mark the label on the appropriate MTM storage box with all the information necessary to duplicate the loads, and transfer them to this box.

Immediately upon completion of loading, I transfer any remaining powder in the measure back to it's original container. Once you walk away, it's hard, if not impossible to determine what the powder is by just looking at it, and if you guess wrong, it could have disastrous effects.

Multiple turrets can be set-up for different calibers and changed in seconds from one caliber to another, without having to re-adjust the dies.

There are several other items that you will find want (Need?) for as you gain more experience; Such as power case trimmers, tumblers, and so on. But the kit comes with all of the basic tools you will to start loading (Except for the dies.).

Good luck, and be sure to tell us how it's going.
 

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One more word of advice.

Only use published loads from well known, reliable sources.

I have Speer's Reloading Manual #13, and Lee's Modern Reloading. Read the "How To" section of whatever manual you decide to purchase before you start, and heed what it says. Reloading is a safe endeavour only when you follow the rules. Doing otherwise is asking for a trip to the hospital or even the morgue. I try to check more than one source before trying a load.

Information can also be obtained for free online from the various powder and bullet manufacturers, although it is limited, and of course, features their products.

Remember that all bullets of the same caliber and weight are not equal. If you are using a 180gr .308 Barnes Bullet, for example with a maximum powder charge listed for a 180gr .308 Combined Technologies Ballistic Silvertip, your pressure will be above SAMMII maximum. Make sure that the load you are using matches the bullet.

Also, always start with a reduced load, and work your way up from there. I've found that my best accuracy comes with loads that are about 5% under the listed maximum anyway.
 

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Thanks. I am not interested in creating any new and improved loads. :D I just want to safely provide some quality, accurate shooters for myself and the family. The sons are grown and we are getting into the shooting more than I ever thought we would. I can see, hopefully, the economy of reloading. Thanks again for the input from all. I really appreciate it.
 

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Red vs Blue..

This post will probly start a flame war, as it all ways does. I don't have anything against Lee, but in my venture with them they are not what I would recommend to somebody. You are buying something for many years of accurate service. Don't sell yourself short. Get good stuff now, and you will use it for a life time. I had the Lee Pro 1000 deicated to .45 caliber and there was all ways something getting out of wack after about 50 rds. I got rid of it. I am not going to say who's better, because the post will start flying after a while. Here we go. This is MHO. :)

 

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Baldy,

I don't know about a "Flame War", but I feel I must at least make a statement in response to your post.

In the many years that I have been reloading, I have never had a problem with any of my Lee products beyond normal parts wear. On top of that, their customer service department is excellent.

I have a Lee Load-all in 12 Ga. that I have been using for almost 20 years. I couldn't even begin to count the number of rounds that have been produced on that simple, inexpensive press. I have had to replace the springs once, and while moving from California back to Florida, I lost the sizing die. On both occasions, a call to Lee had the parts delivered to my door at no charge.

I am not saying that your experience was not a bad one. After all, every company, no matter how good, will send out a lemon every now and then. I just can't see paying twice or more the cost for a piece of equipment that does the same thing, although in time, no matter what you purchase, you will get your money back eventually.

That being stated, one should get the best equipment for their purpose at any cost that one could afford. I bought Lee because finances were tight, and I was a beginning reloader with only a moderate volume of ammo usage. The equipment has never failed me, and I still don't have the opportunity to shoot as much as I would like, and therefore, I have seen no reason to "upgrade". Dillon and Redding do make better presses for experienced or high volume loaders, but I firmly stand behind my recommendation of Lee products, especially for a new reloader that may or may not decide to continue in the practice.

There are many on other forums that believe Kel-Tec's, especially the P-3AT's, to be a waste of money. Mostly because of one bad experience, and not giving them a chance. However, we know differently, don't we? :wink:
 

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magman454 said:
That being stated, one should get the best equipment for their purpose at any cost that one could afford. I bought Lee because finances were tight, and I was a beginning reloader with only a moderate volume of ammo usage. The equipment has never failed me, and I still don't have the opportunity to shoot as much as I would like, and therefore, I have seen no reason to "upgrade". Dillon and Redding do make better presses for experienced or high volume loaders, but I firmly stand behind my recommendation of Lee products, especially for a new reloader that may or may not decide to continue in the practice.
I was playing with this scenario in my head for a while. I am planning on starting reloading, and didn't want to pay for an expensive progressive press after already sinking money into something less fancy. Why not just buy the Dillon XL650 from the beginning, right?

What changed my mind was that I came to the conclusion that a Lee turret press would still be useful after buying a progressive press because of the set-up time/expense involved converting the Dillon over to a different caliber. So my plan is to buy the turret press, use it for all my handloading, then buy a progressive w/conversions later for the calibers I shoot a lot (5.56mm, 10mm, etc.). For a small batch of say, .25ACP, .32NAA, or .380ACP, I will just use the turret press - no expensive conversion kit to buy, and changing calibers is as simple as switching the head & shell holder on the Lee.

An added bonus is that I get to learn on a simpler machine - less chance of a screw up, hopefully.

Any flaws in my logic here?
 

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Re: Red vs Blue..

Baldy said:
This post will probly start a flame war... I don't have anything against Lee, but in my venture with them they are not what I would recommend to somebody... there was all ways something getting out of wack after about 50 rds. I got rid of it. I am not going to say who's better, because the post will start flying after a while. Here we go. This is MHO. :)
I've never had any problem with Lee equipment either. I know what you're saying, though - compared to some of the other progressives the Lee does feel a bit under-engineered and flimsy.
The point is... they work, and work very well. You can get a Lee Progressive 1000 for not much more than a hundred bucks, and while it's not going to feel rock-solid on your bench like a Dillon or other high-end brand, it's always going to crank out that round.
In face, it was a Dillon press that gave me the only equipment-related problems I had in all my years of reloading. I'm not bashing Dillon, but just observing they're not perfect. Same goes for every other maker - R.C.B.S., etc.
Lee equipment is a wonderful value for the money.
Flyer
 

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:) Yes sir Magman your are right about people just like your self who have had little to no trouble with their Lee's. When you dig a little deeper and, find the guys who shoot a few hundred rounds a week then you start to see the difference. Take a guy shooting a league or some deal like that, and he will tell you they have to have a good press. I shoot about 2 to 4 hundred rounds a week. Pluse I load for my son in law who goes through them like candy. I want a press I don't have to keep adjusting on, and fooling with. Lee was not the answer.
Most everybody I know who have bought Lee's for pistol loading have sold them , and bought other brands.
:)
 

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I used a Lee Progressive when I shot IPSC for several years. I'd average a thousand rounds a week and shot every single day (.45 ACP, of course). That equipment contributed to the winning of numerous matches. The idea that you're speaking from experience goes both ways - I've got plenty myself.
Flyer
 

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I am not trying to make it sound like I got anymore experence than anybody. If you had good luck with Lee that's fine with me. For everyman that I know that says he has had succest with Lee I'll show you ten who haven't. Now as long as were writing here there's no way we, me or you can prove what we are saying. So it's a draw. You like them and I wouldn't have one. :D
 
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